Sort by:


click for web site

Lifewave Non-transdermal patches

These are the first products that encompass the energy medicine description. They are non-transdermal patches that offer pain control and energy to the body without any medication or chemical. They contain organic compounds that contain a crystalline matrix that when applied to the skin will offer changes to the bodies' acupuncture meridians. They are sold in 90 countries presently and have a very small presence in the United States. What will it do for global health? It will reduce medication side-effects, by controlling pain. It will change performance in athletes because they will enjoy improved functions without compromising their health.

by: Dean Clark | Jul 28, 2010

4 people like this.


Antibiotic Rotation

Evolutionary pressure drives bacteria to quickly become immune to antibiotics. If the antibiotic is not present, immunity is eventually lost. If an entire class of antibiotic, e.g. penicillins, was not used for, say 20 years, they could be re-introduced starting with the first generation versions and scaling up to later versions as bacteria regain resistance. When re-introduced, another class of antibiotic would be removed, and so on until all classes had been in rotation. This could be continued indefinitely, thus getting new use from older cheap medications and decreasing the need to develop ever more powerful and expensive new medications.

by: Jay Swedloff | Jul 25, 2010

27 people like this.


The Food Fight RTS Game (for Kids)

Become a food wizard. Track your meals and then watch ingredients throw down. Each food generates a virtual "fighter" (think minotaur, goblin, etc.) with specific attributes (hit/attach points) related to nutrition content. Use your (fully customizable) wizard avatar to launch the battle and cast spells/buffs for your team (the good food, obviously). If you win, get experience points + gold (buy loot for your castle). Trade loot with friends on-line or challenge their army (you keep your "fighters" that survive each battle)! Earn extra XP or gold with physical activity. Imagine "bottle cap codes" for celery.

by: Fisher Qua | Aug 10, 2010

9 people like this.


The Fecanator!

Create synthetic bacteria designed to live in the digestive system that converts cellulosic waste (e.g., dietary fiber) into glucose. These bacteria would a] allow us to survive on smaller portions of food and b] reduce human waste. The combination of a] and b] would increase the benefits of foreign food aid to impoverished nations while improving sanitary conditions. (Additional benefit: minimize the frequency of bowel complications in the elderly and other impacted [punny!] populations.) "Blueprints" to the bacteria (possibly multiple) would be released under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial license. (Image, per Creative Commons.)

by: Steven Edwards | Jul 14, 2010

24 people like this.


Un-subsidizing Tobacco by Requiring Insurance

30% of adult health care costs worldwide will soon go towards tobacco-caused diseases because of PAST tobacco use. A little regulation goes a long way: 1) To purchase tobacco, one must have "Smoking Insurance", just as skydivers need "diving insurance" before jumping out of a plane. Smoking insurance will be a rider providing, say $100,000, to cover ONLY tobacco-related health costs, like 99% of any emphysema treatments, 30% of stroke, etc. 2) sharing tobacco - like Vicodin - will not be allowed. Thus, the smoker (not the state) prepays for and is forced to confront the health-related costs of smoking!

by: Bruce Chou | Aug 6, 2010

35 people like this.


MSRA Killer

There are two problems with antibiotics: 1)they attack good and bad bacteria indiscriminately, and 2)bacteria are becoming resistant to them. Now imagine a kind of virus that could single out and destroy specific bacteria. Such viruses, called "bacteriophages", occur naturally. But what if we could isolate or create phages that attack only pernicious bacteria, such as MSRA? Eli Lilly began researching phage therapy in the 1940s but abandoned it because antibiotics were easier to develop. Despite this, the Soviets used phages with success during the World War II. Perhaps it is time to revisit phage therapy using modern techniques.

by: Pietro Michelucci | Sep 1, 2010

4 people like this.



click for full image

Condom for Africa

In Africa, many believe in the traditional power of juju amulets (bracelets, often made of elephant hair), to protect them from HIV / AIDS. There can also be a low estimation of the effectiveness of condoms. A condom developed in consultation with traditional healers could incorporate features of the amulet, such as a spell & a sliver of elephant hair (or alternative?) molded into the base ring. Such a culturally adapted product could prove more effective.

by: Raymond stockill | Jun 25, 2010

50 people like this.


Reducing flu spread by bowing

A simple idea: flu and other illness (e.g. diarrhea) can be spread by shaking hands, cheek kissing, and hugging. We should promote bowing as the preferred way of greeting. This avoids spreading bacteria via hand-shaking, hugging, and kissing. If extreme intimacy or respect is needed people can touch their foreheads.

by: Eric Durbrow | Jun 24, 2010

39 people like this.



click for web site

The Resting Postures

Chronic pain, disability, and premature organ death result from tonic or rigid areas in the body that do not allow earlier common injuries to properly heal. We compensate for pain with ingrained movement patterns in our nervous system, and stay rigid in these areas to our ill health. Lying in simple, anatomically aligned postures is a low-tech solution, using breath control for deep relaxation. Resting in good posture daily overcomes tight fascia and muscular compensations and inhibits the nervous system's tendency to recoil from the memory of discomfort. Clinical rehabilitation with The Resting Postures has shown significantly improved outcomes.

by: Michael Sears | Jul 23, 2010

63 people like this.



click for full image

Would you eat off a toilet seat?

As a pre-school art teacher, I know school cleanliness standards and would never ask students to eat off a changing table. When my husband was hospitalized, I found out the standards were not the same in hospitals. Everyday in hospitals and nursing homes, patients do this. The handy bedside hospital tray table is used for food service, prep space for incontinent bedding changes and prep space for wound dressing materials. In this painting, I am trying to spread awareness of this "unmentionable" problem. I hope by doing this we can increase patient safety outcomes in our most compromised patients.

by: Regina Holliday | Aug 22, 2010

189 people like this.


Now that you're inspired, enter your idea!