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Pepfly

Pepfly is built on the idea that brief experiences of positive emotion can have a powerful effect over time. Many of us already search the web for content to inspire us, make us laugh, or remind us of the beauty around us. Pepfly is a new way to find, save, share, and enjoy what moves us. Pepfly recognizes the words you use to describe emotions and make sense of them in psychological terms. It connects you to a piece of media that might work for you and finds patterns in your ratings so it can make better recommendations.

by: Jeremy Bersin | Jul 16, 2010

30 people like this.


The Cure is (Already) Out There

The problem isn't finding a cure, it's bringing it to market. Drugs like "DCA" and "GcMAF", can already cure HIV and put common cancers into remission. These claims are supported by peer-reviewed medical research. Why, then, are these treatments not evaluated by the FDA and made available to the public? Answer: these substances are already in the public domain, so pharmaceuticals can't profit from them. The solution is to fix the public policy that motivates this behavior by allowing companies to compete for time-limited, exclusive rights to manufacture and sell the public domain treatments. Win-win.

by: Pietro Michelucci | Aug 24, 2010

8 people like this.



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Young Cancer Patients develop online-community, University Medical Centre facillitates

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC) helps young people with cancer develop their own communities. RUNMC starts with the development of AYA4 (All information You've Asked For): a unique online community for and by young people with cancer. The University hospital facilitates the technique, support and innovation, but it is the patients themselves who determine the content of the community and start filling. They create themselves a digital place where young people with cancer and their families can meet, exchange essential information, ask questions and share knowledge and feeling.

by: Lucien Engelen | Aug 12, 2010

7 people like this.



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100 Mile Food Game

Want to play a game that makes eating local food easier? Are you a hunter, gatherer, or farmer? Playing the 100 Mile Food Game is simple and fun! You use your mobile device to win local food prizes, team up with allies to hunt for sweets and goods, trade tips, geo-tag nutrient sources, nurture gardens, earn badges, and more! Have you heard of the "100 Mile Diet"? The goal is fun: eat food from within 100 mile radius! Now that's impact! The developers of Plantacious.com bring you the 100 Mile Food Game! Are you ready to play???

by: Daniel Durrant | Sep 1, 2010

3 people like this.


Augmented Reality Gym Mirror

When you're working out at the gym, a mirror in front of you shows you a visualization of your future self - thinner, more muscular, generally in better shape than you currently are. This is such a compelling vision that it motivates people to exercise more to move towards matching it. It can start off being installed in high-end gyms, then filter down into Wii-like applications used at home.

by: Lisa Mumbach and Jason Tester, IFTF | Jun 12, 2010

128 people like this.


Sauna Dialysis

The skin is arguably the largest organ of the body and contains 3,ooo,ooo sweat glands similar in function to the 2,ooo,ooo nephrons in the kidney and capable of excreting 1.5-3 liters of fluid per hour compared to the kidney's average 1-2 liters per day along with the same electrolytes and wastes. Protocols using a sauna could be developed to maximize perspiration and waste removal while the patient rehydrates using an electrolyte drink. This would treat mild renal failure, extend the interval between regular dialysis for more severe cases, be lifesaving in the third world and provide a more comfortable experience.

by: Jason Allen | Jul 27, 2010

18 people like this.


Children's Social Skills Toolkits

As a School Psychologist, I am in close contact with students, teachers and parents. I witness daily the need to prepare children to become optimistic citizens, open to exchange, cooperation and solidarity. Thanks to local partnership, I gathered relevant documents (115) to support teacher's action in their own classrooms. With my support, they can loan one of the three suitcases (following their school level) and later pool their experiences on a dedicated blog, open to any other reader. Aiming to develop children's social skills, these toolkits may improve the climate, their sense of responsability and motivation in classrooms and schools.

by: Daniele Ruaud | Aug 29, 2010

5 people like this.



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Green Clinic

The goal is to rethink of tools and health services under a renewed system of requirements and proximity to environmental health issues. The Green Clinic is a service that answers to a wider definition of health modeled on specific needs of a neighborhood. A service that uses technology, but it can also be seen as a concrete point of contact where motivated individuals and professionals from different sectors (not only the medical one) can work together to make places and lifestyles healthy. Green Clinic rethinks of medical practice through the interdisciplinary activity, where, information, lifestyle and cities are the workplaces.

by: Lorenza | Aug 24, 2010

4 people like this.


Improving survival rates from cardiac arrests using mobile phones

We have started a global project to empower the people to locate the nearest automated external defibrillators (AEDs) during emergencies. We are approaching 3000 AED locations worldwide,which is only the tip of the iceberg. It only takes one AED to save one life. We have developed phone apps to allow the public to locate the nearest public AEDs. iPhone users can download the free "AED Nearby" app, Android users the free "ShowNearby AED" app. More apps are being developed. Our methods will encourage those who are afraid to do CPR to participate in the chain of survival to save lives.

by: Dana Elliott MD | Jul 22, 2010

87 people like this.


Snot Spots!

Immediate reagent tests for antibiotic resistance in any infection, required to be used on site, at prescription. Ever had a real sinus infection and gone through five rounds of antibiotics to clear it? The common practice is to prescribe the most common (least effective) drug first, and work up in Russian roulette style trial and error. The development of a simple swipe pad that looked for resistance markers would greatly reduce the use of the WRONG drugs, while lowering the spread of disease by treating effectively the First Time. Fewer sick days, fewer broad spectrum exposures, better cures!

by: Lissa Probus | Aug 10, 2010

6 people like this.


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