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Non-Wearable Fall Protector

Falls are frequent cause of injuries and broken bones in the elderly. Development of reliable and safe fall-protection systems can help people stay healthy and live longer. The main reason of prior failures is that fall-protection techniques required people to wear either bulky padded garments, or complex inflatable garments. Instead, external sensors of the proposed system will monitor people in their environment and cause external inflator units activate protective air bags. Inflators will be positioned either around the periphery of Rumba¯-like robots, along walls, or even under carpets. Fall sensors will be based on recently developed 3D imaging cameras.

by: Michael Feygin | Jul 29, 2010

22 people like this.

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app for computer using MRI device scan data

MRI uses density to create 3d images where tissues are easily recognizable by the trained eye. Someone has yet to create software that uses MRI data to isolate the ~232 different cell types and ~78 separate organs by density. I would like to see MRI R&D communities create some sort of 3D CAD model that color-codes both healthy and non-healthy tissues and organs for physicians to study. I have linked to Prof. Laurie Hall's 1998 lecture on the technology I am referring to that needs the "killer app" to go with upcoming HD MRI equipment.

by: Jesse Doig | Jul 2, 2010

27 people like this.

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Young Cancer Patients develop online-community, University Medical Centre facillitates

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC) helps young people with cancer develop their own communities. RUNMC starts with the development of AYA4 (All information You've Asked For): a unique online community for and by young people with cancer. The University hospital facilitates the technique, support and innovation, but it is the patients themselves who determine the content of the community and start filling. They create themselves a digital place where young people with cancer and their families can meet, exchange essential information, ask questions and share knowledge and feeling.

by: Lucien Engelen | Aug 12, 2010

7 people like this.

Sauna Dialysis

The skin is arguably the largest organ of the body and contains 3,ooo,ooo sweat glands similar in function to the 2,ooo,ooo nephrons in the kidney and capable of excreting 1.5-3 liters of fluid per hour compared to the kidney's average 1-2 liters per day along with the same electrolytes and wastes. Protocols using a sauna could be developed to maximize perspiration and waste removal while the patient rehydrates using an electrolyte drink. This would treat mild renal failure, extend the interval between regular dialysis for more severe cases, be lifesaving in the third world and provide a more comfortable experience.

by: Jason Allen | Jul 27, 2010

18 people like this.

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Home is where the heart is. Healthy home=Healthy heart.

Making your home into a healthy environment is necessary so we can progress to actively monitor our health needs. The healthy home will have a smart refrigerator that keeps count of calories, nutrition, and even recommends certain foods. The healthy home will also have a bacterial analyzer toilet. All this information will be sent to the central hub or a family computer. This will make it easy for new devices to be added, like glucose meters for diabetics. This system will make it much easier to make informed health decisions and keep all information in one simple location.

by: John Dzikiy | Jul 16, 2010

23 people like this.

Revolutionize Drug Development, Really, Not on Paper

Thousands of new compounds (or old compounds for new indications) are not being tested because of boxed thinking within the current system, and prohibitive cost of clinical stages of development. The proposal is to utilize a completely transparent crowdsourcing model and convergence of modern computer sciences / healthcare IT with drug development know-how. As a result, higher quality data will be generated faster and cheaper, bringing many of new chemical entities and "repurposed" generics to patients. The adoption of this method will make the legacy drug development paradigm obsolete, and result in dramatic savings to the healthcare systems globally.

by: Tomasz Sablinski | Aug 25, 2010

22 people like this.

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Ever been laid up in a bed with a major illness or injury? Visiting hours only cover a small portion of the day in hospital and even at home friends and family are often at work. Medication, procedures and lack of routine can leave patients awake and lonely at all hours. We have the technology to solve this right now. Think iPads and an application like Twitter and you get Wellcome, a place where patients and voluntary supporters from around the world (different time zones mean there's always a volunteer who's awake) congregate to chat and connect.

by: Jon Brown | Jul 26, 2010

23 people like this.

MSRA Killer

There are two problems with antibiotics: 1)they attack good and bad bacteria indiscriminately, and 2)bacteria are becoming resistant to them. Now imagine a kind of virus that could single out and destroy specific bacteria. Such viruses, called "bacteriophages", occur naturally. But what if we could isolate or create phages that attack only pernicious bacteria, such as MSRA? Eli Lilly began researching phage therapy in the 1940s but abandoned it because antibiotics were easier to develop. Despite this, the Soviets used phages with success during the World War II. Perhaps it is time to revisit phage therapy using modern techniques.

by: Pietro Michelucci | Sep 1, 2010

4 people like this.

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Avoidiabetes Movement - Recognize Risk Early

One in two individuals worldwide is at risk of developing diabetes or metabolic disease during their lifetime and at great socio-economic cost. Research identifies over fifty health conditions as early risk indicators for diabetes. Avoiding diabetes is possible - eight to fourteen years before a possible diagnosis - naturally and without major costly interventions. But patients are on their own. The Avoidiabetes movement aims to develop worldwide satellite systems of specialized Early Diabetes Risk Recognition and Avoidance health professionals. In addition, we are developing a system of public live-in centers teaching meal preparation, food shopping, and Avoidiabetes lifestyle management.

by: Rivkah Roth | Aug 2, 2010

40 people like this.

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Opal Guide to StayingAsSaneAsPossible

As disorder naturally increases with competition for resources and living depends more on adaptability, Opal's Guide to Staying-As-Sane-As-Possible saves precious energy in deciding where-to-go-next. This information process allows individuals, families, communities, nations and cultures to refocus attention more efficiently from sickening fears to healthier "feelgoods" by matching a different scale of natures to a sense of personal pleasure so that greater potential can return. A range of regularly reviewed media outlets would make possible the "owning"¯ of a generic world-view, based on the most accurate information available. Personalized props like totem jewelery, paraphernalia etc. would serve as reminders.

by: Opal Ocean | Aug 16, 2010

6 people like this.

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