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MSRA Killer

There are two problems with antibiotics: 1)they attack good and bad bacteria indiscriminately, and 2)bacteria are becoming resistant to them. Now imagine a kind of virus that could single out and destroy specific bacteria. Such viruses, called "bacteriophages", occur naturally. But what if we could isolate or create phages that attack only pernicious bacteria, such as MSRA? Eli Lilly began researching phage therapy in the 1940s but abandoned it because antibiotics were easier to develop. Despite this, the Soviets used phages with success during the World War II. Perhaps it is time to revisit phage therapy using modern techniques.

by: Pietro Michelucci | Sep 1, 2010

4 people like this.



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Study Healthy People

Take detailed personal and family histories. Educate and interview parents in depth about what constitutes psychological trauma and take trauma histories. Do developmental attachment histories. Test for multiple intelligences and creativity quotients (CQ). Sequence the healthy genome. Develop tests to assess epigenetic factors and do epigenetic assessments. Come up with one integrated instrument to fully measure and predict health trajectories.

by: Sigmund Jung | Jul 27, 2010

6 people like this.


Sauna Dialysis

The skin is arguably the largest organ of the body and contains 3,ooo,ooo sweat glands similar in function to the 2,ooo,ooo nephrons in the kidney and capable of excreting 1.5-3 liters of fluid per hour compared to the kidney's average 1-2 liters per day along with the same electrolytes and wastes. Protocols using a sauna could be developed to maximize perspiration and waste removal while the patient rehydrates using an electrolyte drink. This would treat mild renal failure, extend the interval between regular dialysis for more severe cases, be lifesaving in the third world and provide a more comfortable experience.

by: Jason Allen | Jul 27, 2010

18 people like this.



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Home Sweet Home - Food replicator concept

There are a million of people hungry right now when you are reading this, so think about: if we could help them without material costs? I believe that will be possible to help more and more people everyday. This is the idea of the Home Sweet Home concept, which scans molecules present in a specific food, reproducing it on your plate at home using elements existing in the air, such as molecules of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. TAKE A LOOK, I BELIEVE THAT IT WILL IMPRESS YOU!

by: Bruno Oro | Jul 20, 2010

953 people like this.


Radical Sucks!

How about offering Liposuction at a partly subsidised rate on the NHS - whereby the patient pays up front for the procedure (say £500 for example). Then at regular follow ups, if the patient has maintained their weight and adopted a healthier lifestyle (determined by some sort of health checks) then they get their £500 back! Its radical and I reckon it would work in most cases as there is a financial incentive for both sides -the patient wants their cash back, the NHS wants to prevent future admissions (It would have to be a one time only offer though)!

by: Les Fawcett | Jul 12, 2010

30 people like this.



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Neuro-Enrich the Zygote

This idea is to start enriching the brain as early as possible. To paraphrase neuro-psychiatrist Bruce Perry, "If you're in the healthcare business, you're in the brain change business." Neurologist Robert Scaer agrees: "(How well the early brain develops) shapes every aspect of existence ... specifically, our physical and mental health. Canadian cancer specialist, Gabor Mate agrees: "The biology of potential illness arises early in life. The brain's stress response mechanisms are programmed ... in infancy. Cancer, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and the other conditions ... are not abrupt new developments in adult life, but culminations of lifelong processes.

by: Mark Brady | Jul 26, 2010

11 people like this.



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Data Mining for Health

An easy-to-use, fun social application for smartphones that helps people make dietary choices and uses collected data to analyze health-trends. How it works: Enter your personal information, take pictures of what you're eating, and the software will tell you if you will go over your caloric requirements for the day (amongst other things); and for fun your "pics" will be Tweeted or sent to Facebook. Essentially, this is a food journal mixed with other interactive tools. The twist in this, though, is that data will be used to identify health trends. Big people eat cookies? Maybe cookies causes obesity!

by: Harry Chong | Jun 25, 2010

29 people like this.


biomarkers with patient and expert crowdsourcing

Make free the ability to get a 1000-panel blood test quarterly. Blood testing, DNA, physicals, etc. Sensors/chromatograph/chip reader machines will need the same kind of focus as DNA sequencers. Capture the data and publish in a public website that plots trends with comparisons. Allow individuals to review the data, read professional analysis results and blog their symptoms. Statisticians, scientists and engineers can aggregate and mine the data. Over time, real cause-and-effect will emerge. Continuos improvement in this whole feedback & analysis system, could help attain unknown hieghts of health mastery. So Bill, Melinda, Warren, ...we better hurry up! :-)

by: Allen Brown | Jul 25, 2010

11 people like this.


Un-subsidizing Tobacco by Requiring Insurance

30% of adult health care costs worldwide will soon go towards tobacco-caused diseases because of PAST tobacco use. A little regulation goes a long way: 1) To purchase tobacco, one must have "Smoking Insurance", just as skydivers need "diving insurance" before jumping out of a plane. Smoking insurance will be a rider providing, say $100,000, to cover ONLY tobacco-related health costs, like 99% of any emphysema treatments, 30% of stroke, etc. 2) sharing tobacco - like Vicodin - will not be allowed. Thus, the smoker (not the state) prepays for and is forced to confront the health-related costs of smoking!

by: Bruce Chou | Aug 6, 2010

35 people like this.



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A better, bigger burn in fat and muscle (ABIFAM)

Obesity is alarmingly prevalent in developed and developing countries, putting countless people at increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and death. Clinical trials show consistently that diet and exercise induce weight loss temporarily and that the weight is regained within two years. We need an assist. Recently, we discovered a potential drug to treat obesity. It works by increasing the ability of muscle and fat tissues to burn energy (patent pending). Investment in research and development can, within a decade, convert this potential therapy into what so many people have been looking for: an effective way to lose weight.

by: Jonathan R. Brestoff | Aug 9, 2010

17 people like this.


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