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World 5.0

I can think of no more valid entry than one that re-orients ourselves and our culture to the reality of This Moment. This moment is total, and how we fill it is our prime concern. This is where World 5.0 begins, and this fresh orientation allows for personal and planetary healing as we recognize we are literally "all in this together". Of course, the end of war and the elitist agenda would do wonders for transforming our lifestyles as well. Peace out.

by: Jim Prues | Jul 23, 2010

9 people like this.


The Recovery Project

The Recovery Project would organize people's personal narratives of recovery so that they can be best learned from by others. By letting patients see what others have done and by creating high-level meta-narratives, patients can see the decision trees that others have used, saving time in creating their own from scratch. Sharing and reading similar narratives provides an affective component to possibilities for personal health -- critical when conditions require changes of habit. And experts and practitioners will be able to contribute their stories of helping patients recover, integrating various medical professions' perspectives, instead of creating a divide.

by: Michael Nagle | Aug 2, 2010

1141 people like this.



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Pepfly

Pepfly is built on the idea that brief experiences of positive emotion can have a powerful effect over time. Many of us already search the web for content to inspire us, make us laugh, or remind us of the beauty around us. Pepfly is a new way to find, save, share, and enjoy what moves us. Pepfly recognizes the words you use to describe emotions and make sense of them in psychological terms. It connects you to a piece of media that might work for you and finds patterns in your ratings so it can make better recommendations.

by: Jeremy Bersin | Jul 16, 2010

30 people like this.



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Mental Evolution 2.0

Mental illness affects over 1 billion people worldwide creating an economic burden of $2 trillion. Current drug treatments are expensive, suboptimal, and have significant side-effects. We have designed novel brain training software that targets fundamental cognitive deficits common to a majority of mental illnesses. This 'deep neuroscience' approach allows personalized treatment of an unprecedented range of conditions including learning, mood, anxiety, psychosis, and impulse-control disorders. The social network-embedded software we are developing is low cost, internet-based, has no side-effects and, in ongoing research, has already driven clinical improvements in children with autism and brain injury patients.

by: David Delany | Aug 31, 2010

27 people like this.


Cure the Veterans, Cure the World

Veterans disproportionately suffer from many life-changing conditions where research is, too often, underfunded. CTV/CTW would provide a web accessible directory of businesses committed to raising or donating specific amounts each year, with revenue being used to fund all stages of cure-focused research. Discoveries, positive and negative, would be published in peer-reviewed, open access journals. Seminars would be streamed freely online. Initial goals include curing PTSD, restoring fuction after TBIs and SCIs, and regenerating skin for burn victims and limbs for amputees. (Image is in Public Domain.)

by: Steven Edwards | Aug 7, 2010

336 people like this.



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Health Buddies

Why should only the affluent have personal trainers? I propose a website that matches people with similar goals (fitness, rehabilitation, diet, etc). Each person can then be accountable to their health buddy (and vice-versa), who will check on progress, provide moral support, set challenges, and even award virtual badges for accomplishments. Often we don't derive the same instant gratification for treating our bodies right that we get from so many other things in life, but our health buddies can provide the immediate feedback we all crave, keeping us motivated to get healthy and stay healthy.

by: Pietro Michelucci | Aug 20, 2010

19 people like this.


[PIP.APSSA] Personalized Informatics Platform (with Agents-Protocols-Sensors-Server Architecture)

The PIP.APSSA project offers the way towards a simpler and more convenient process for delivering the dreams of ubiquitous personalized medicine. The platform conceptualizes a unique modular architecture and overall design that encourages both adoption for business development and access for end-user extensibility. Nearly endless use cases and applications exist for this platform. Two possibilities follow: *A workflow for better datasets and more inclusive, emergent metrics to study the human diseasome and the ontogeny of human-environment interactions. *Implicit clearinghouse for established and upcoming medical technologies/services that helps match patients to treatments and technology transfer firms to consumer/ business bases.

by: Saran Eswaran & Ryan Carbrey | Sep 1, 2010

4 people like this.


Piezo-powered (and tasty!) Dental Care

Improve oral hygiene (particularly in children) by developing nanoscale, digestible piezoelectric motors. Combined in gum (and other candy) with digestible, AI-driven nanoscale devices that autonomously seek out and degrade plaque, the simple and enjoyable act of chewing candy would paradoxically provide protection from cavities and gum disease. Designs would be released through Creative Commons. (Image per Creative Commons.)

by: Steven Edwards | Aug 7, 2010

12 people like this.


Powered By the Masses

Working out for community. My idea is this. You enter a gym where people are getting in better shape and at the same time pumping energy into city's electrical grid. Inside of every exercise machine we have a generator and whenever a person exercises, they give back the energy by spinning the generators. With new neodymium magnets and better generator designs we can achieve a significant energy inflow into the electrical grid. Make the gyms and people compete between each other as to who makes the most energy in a given month, reward accordingly.

by: Max Surguy | Aug 31, 2010

7 people like this.


The Fecanator!

Create synthetic bacteria designed to live in the digestive system that converts cellulosic waste (e.g., dietary fiber) into glucose. These bacteria would a] allow us to survive on smaller portions of food and b] reduce human waste. The combination of a] and b] would increase the benefits of foreign food aid to impoverished nations while improving sanitary conditions. (Additional benefit: minimize the frequency of bowel complications in the elderly and other impacted [punny!] populations.) "Blueprints" to the bacteria (possibly multiple) would be released under a Creative Commons Non-Commercial license. (Image, per Creative Commons.)

by: Steven Edwards | Jul 14, 2010

24 people like this.


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