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Carbon Chemistry for Life

Everyone, particularly the obese, would benefit by reducing carbon from simple sugars, like High Fructose Corn Syrup and table sugar, with Mannoheptulose, the 7-carbon sugar in Avocados, and C3H8O3 glycerol, found in sweet wine and used for making soap and bio-diesel. Specifically, 5% of calories from Mannoheptulose and 35% from Glycerin. Obese people could also use the GI dynamics Endo Barrier to lose weight and increase health. The device is in use in Europe and helps with weight and blood sugar problems. This diet would also reduce protein intake for those over 60 to 45-60 grams of protein per day.

by: Eric Anderson | Jul 25, 2010

6 people like this.


Piezo-powered (and tasty!) Dental Care

Improve oral hygiene (particularly in children) by developing nanoscale, digestible piezoelectric motors. Combined in gum (and other candy) with digestible, AI-driven nanoscale devices that autonomously seek out and degrade plaque, the simple and enjoyable act of chewing candy would paradoxically provide protection from cavities and gum disease. Designs would be released through Creative Commons. (Image per Creative Commons.)

by: Steven Edwards | Aug 7, 2010

12 people like this.



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Low-Cost Safe Device to Lower High Blood Pressure

Acutend is a non-invasive neuro-stimulation device derived from established Acupuncture principles. Used once-daily for 5mns by simple skin contact, Acutend significantly lowers high blood pressure (3x efficiency of standard medication). Acutend is a proven, easy-to-use patented device that is safe and portable and can save billions of patients wordwide. Most importantly, Acutend is non-invasive, has no medical side effects (unlike standard medication) and it offers high compliance as it doesn't have to be used everyday for sustained benefits. Acutend can be manufactured at low cost and be used stand-alone or in conjunction with drugs for higher HBP reduction.

by: Patrick Suel | Aug 1, 2010

15 people like this.


Mirror Neuron System in Kindergarden Dining Hall

Some children have bad eating habits. We designed a digital projector software with a mirror neuron system to show funny cartoon figures in an eating story in kindergarten dining halls. Designing funny eating jokes involved with their figures activates memories in the mirror neuron system and persuades children to eat healthy, joyful food with corresponding funny objects. The system gives them virtual prizes and virtual gifts for their good habits by the cognitive vision measurement of similarity. Furthermore, we can design a mirron neuron system to make all eating happier and more conscious, not just in schools.

by: Zhuang, Chao | Jul 27, 2010

13 people like this.


Reusable Ionizing Capsules for Water Purification

Our idea is Reusable Ionizing Capsules for Water Purification, which have been distributed to over 37 countries in the past 10 years. Our AquaSmarter Capsules, which last for 1 full year, can completely purify 1 liter of biologically contaminated water in minutes and 5 gallons in 24 hours. When concentrated, AquaSmarter Ionized Water also works as a powerful disinfectant.

by: Stephen Verdon, Ph.D. | Aug 22, 2010

19 people like this.


Sense your body

Develop a pill that boosts the sensitivity of the part of the brain that feels the body, to become hypersensitive to bodily sensations. This would naturally push people to eat better and exercise more but without excess. As a side effect, if enough people take it, it would change the mix of foods in shops toward more healthy choices for other people. It would also make people more aware of the impact the body has on the mind... fostering a more mindful attitude and improved behavior in other areas of life.

by: Nicolas de cordes | Jul 26, 2010

17 people like this.


Antibiotic Rotation

Evolutionary pressure drives bacteria to quickly become immune to antibiotics. If the antibiotic is not present, immunity is eventually lost. If an entire class of antibiotic, e.g. penicillins, was not used for, say 20 years, they could be re-introduced starting with the first generation versions and scaling up to later versions as bacteria regain resistance. When re-introduced, another class of antibiotic would be removed, and so on until all classes had been in rotation. This could be continued indefinitely, thus getting new use from older cheap medications and decreasing the need to develop ever more powerful and expensive new medications.

by: Jay Swedloff | Jul 25, 2010

27 people like this.



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Wellcome

Ever been laid up in a bed with a major illness or injury? Visiting hours only cover a small portion of the day in hospital and even at home friends and family are often at work. Medication, procedures and lack of routine can leave patients awake and lonely at all hours. We have the technology to solve this right now. Think iPads and an application like Twitter and you get Wellcome, a place where patients and voluntary supporters from around the world (different time zones mean there's always a volunteer who's awake) congregate to chat and connect.

by: Jon Brown | Jul 26, 2010

23 people like this.


Crowdsourced Citizen Science

A local parish uses a smartphone app to let their members collect air pollution data in their community. The app recommends whether it is safe for them to be outdoors and allows them to contribute this data to the parish pollution network for aggregate analysis and mapping of pollution in the parish. Once they find the most polluted spots, they can initiate clean-up and lobbying efforts to benefit their community.

by: Mathias Crawford and Jason Tester, IFTF | Jun 12, 2010

43 people like this.


Pathogen Sensing Refrigerator

Food-borne illness are a significant concern in the U.S. Refrigerators could be equipped with sensors to detect bacterial contamination by the chemicals given off as gases by many of these bacteria. These types of sensors are already in use at the industrial level of food production. The approximate location of the contaminated food in the refrigerator would be determined by triangulation using multiple sensors placed at different locations in the refrigerator. The individual contaminated food would then be identified by passing each of the suspected items in turn directly in front of one of the sensors.

by: Jules Wellinghoff | Aug 7, 2010

56 people like this.


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