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Play It! Say It! Can gaming support mental health?

PLAY IT! SAY IT! is simple - we propose to use the existing communication functionalities of video game consoles (voice chat and messaging) to provide phone and online counselling to the people who use them. The online video game community is larger than the population of Canada, and at least one 1 in 5 people playing have a mental health condition. Beyond the existing benefits of online and phone counselling, consoles offer universal access points to ensure coverage, and the opportunity to develop rapport while playing simple games to support the sharing of concerns. We value quality of life.

by: Elizabeth Ure, Andrew Shaw & Adam Bass | Aug 18, 2010

178 people like this.


Sauna Dialysis

The skin is arguably the largest organ of the body and contains 3,ooo,ooo sweat glands similar in function to the 2,ooo,ooo nephrons in the kidney and capable of excreting 1.5-3 liters of fluid per hour compared to the kidney's average 1-2 liters per day along with the same electrolytes and wastes. Protocols using a sauna could be developed to maximize perspiration and waste removal while the patient rehydrates using an electrolyte drink. This would treat mild renal failure, extend the interval between regular dialysis for more severe cases, be lifesaving in the third world and provide a more comfortable experience.

by: Jason Allen | Jul 27, 2010

18 people like this.



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Transforming Homebound Healthcare by Increasing Patient Motivation

Therapists drive 5 billion miles annually to treat 12 million homebound patients, yet 28% of disabled patients return to the hospital due to lack of follow-up. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) technology is prohibitively expensive, resulting in a population of digital outcasts who must create their own incentive to self-monitor improvement. The next generation of RPM is a patient-centric network of affordable mobile apps that utilize patients’ sense of touch. These connect to wireless exercise devices embedded with sensors that measure pressure, sustainable force and release. Benefits include increased patient contact, greater adherence to therapy and more accurate progress monitoring.

by: Kel Smith | Aug 27, 2010

12 people like this.


Wellth Exchange

The system is going to treat your health like a commodity - why not do the same? Build equity. Sell shares. Trade your wellth credits on the exchange. To incentivize healthy behavior, health-related organizations (HRO's) award individuals "credit" for doing certain things - whether making a purchase decision or maintaining specific behaviors. These credits can then be used in the marketplace to purchase products, get discounts on insurance, or be donated to others. Companies might be required to "purchase" health-offset credits if they want to sell "unhealthful" things or build a new development (health impact studies for all!).

by: Fisher | Aug 3, 2010

19 people like this.



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Low-Cost Safe Device to Lower High Blood Pressure

Acutend is a non-invasive neuro-stimulation device derived from established Acupuncture principles. Used once-daily for 5mns by simple skin contact, Acutend significantly lowers high blood pressure (3x efficiency of standard medication). Acutend is a proven, easy-to-use patented device that is safe and portable and can save billions of patients wordwide. Most importantly, Acutend is non-invasive, has no medical side effects (unlike standard medication) and it offers high compliance as it doesn't have to be used everyday for sustained benefits. Acutend can be manufactured at low cost and be used stand-alone or in conjunction with drugs for higher HBP reduction.

by: Patrick Suel | Aug 1, 2010

15 people like this.


Peace by evolution

This is a t-shirt with a picture of a human cell's 46 chromosomes, representing the human genome, the result of millions of years of evolution. A new paradigm embracing the idea that a greater appreciation for what constitutes the evolution of our species, could have an admirable change on how man treats himself and his fellow men.

by: Anthony D'Auria | Jul 27, 2010

22 people like this.


Sense your body

Develop a pill that boosts the sensitivity of the part of the brain that feels the body, to become hypersensitive to bodily sensations. This would naturally push people to eat better and exercise more but without excess. As a side effect, if enough people take it, it would change the mix of foods in shops toward more healthy choices for other people. It would also make people more aware of the impact the body has on the mind... fostering a more mindful attitude and improved behavior in other areas of life.

by: Nicolas de cordes | Jul 26, 2010

17 people like this.



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Videogame Style HUD for your health and life.

Stress is the enemy, stress weakens, this is a known problem with the human body. The solution? Essentially a mobile phone app that displays a visual stress/environment "Heads Up Display". Using a vidoegame style HUD to help manage/guide/predict Mood, Sleep, Exercise, Food (calories, fat sugar etc) unreturned calls, phase of the moon, Biorhythms, unprocessed Emails, unread tweets, or anything else that can be reasonably represented graphically. It should display an instant simple visual 'Heads Up' showing stress points that can be focused on. By tracking stress inducing things, you feel less stress because it feels "managed" and manageable.

by: Tim O'Callaghan | Jun 25, 2010

32 people like this.


TV-Treadmill

A television that is powered by a treadmill. It will only power up with the use of a treadmill being utilized. With significant use, the power can be stored in a battery to reward hard work with a break. All family members can chip in and add time. The key would have to be that the reserve, built up power resets on a regular basis, say every 48 hours. That way you can't bank tons of time without continuous effort. Maybe other equipment like a row machine, stair climber, weight machine could tie in for variety and full body coverage.

by: Gerald Griffith | Aug 17, 2010

14 people like this.



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Young Cancer Patients develop online-community, University Medical Centre facillitates

Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC) helps young people with cancer develop their own communities. RUNMC starts with the development of AYA4 (All information You've Asked For): a unique online community for and by young people with cancer. The University hospital facilitates the technique, support and innovation, but it is the patients themselves who determine the content of the community and start filling. They create themselves a digital place where young people with cancer and their families can meet, exchange essential information, ask questions and share knowledge and feeling.

by: Lucien Engelen | Aug 12, 2010

7 people like this.


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